3 Study Technique Tips for New Language Learners

Most of us are aware of the subtle differences in how each of us learns information, both in the classroom, and on the job or in the field. There are some commonalities in how memory works, for example remembering the first and last items in a list, or having an easier time digesting numbers in groups (it’s usually easier to remember 483 than 4, 8, and 3). But that being said, there are also distinct differences in our strengths and weaknesses. Some people truly do learn better listening to a lecture than reading a book, while others will get the most out of classes where slides and diagrams are used. Some of us like to organize our information in bullet point lists, while others need a single mnemonic to memorize an entire paragraph. But when it comes to language learning, study suggestions are so often the same; vocabulary flash cards in particular come to mind. Don’t get me wrong, flash cards are great, and sometimes they can turn rote memorization into a more streamlined process. But given how many different ways we all prefer to intake information, it’s not a bad idea to collect different techniques and tools. Continue reading “3 Study Technique Tips for New Language Learners”

How to Make the Most of Your College Electives

If you going into college already set on what you want to study and the degree(s) you hope to graduate with, then college electives may seem like stumbling blocks to the finish line. But they’re actually incredibly useful and can improve your overall job prospects if you approach them right; it’s not just universities trying to take an extra dollar out of your pocket. Although it can sometimes feel that way – try to make the most of your required electives! Plus, if you go into school with no idea what you want to do or what you want to study, they’re just that much more important and helpful for exploring. Continue reading “How to Make the Most of Your College Electives”

4 Powerful Tips To Help You Overcome Culture Shock

Anger. Of all the emotions associated with culture shock, anger was the one I expected the least. I had never experienced culture shock in any real way before, and I had traveled enough to think that I was somehow uniquely immune. Maybe I was just peculiarly cosmopolitan, open-minded, or adaptable to new experiences. Two weeks into a trip to Myanmar, it seemed like I had been correct. Of course I felt the occasional pang of loneliness or problems with communication, but overall I felt comfortable and at ease. Continue reading “4 Powerful Tips To Help You Overcome Culture Shock”

Unusual Places to Stay While Traveling

The appeal for many that enjoy traveling is the idea of getting out of ones comfort zone – and that includes where you lay your head each night. Hotels are convenient if you’re a new traveler and want to have a guarantee of the comfort of where you’re staying. They can also be a necessity if you’re going on a trip that is high impact in terms of baggage, where you need a shuttle service, or with many schedules to accommodate, or if you’re trying to coordinate with a large number of people. But for a smaller and more flexible trip, there are a number of unique and sometime exciting places to stay that are a bit more off the wall. Here are just a few ideas for travelers looking for novel travel accommodations. Continue reading “Unusual Places to Stay While Traveling”

The Pros and Cons of Year Round School

It’s hard to imagine life without summer vacation. What would we do without lazy summer days catching up on sleep, spending the day at the beach, or trying to earn some money in a seasonal job? The summer-off schedule evolved when we had a more agricultural society, so that kids could help families on the farm. Some say that this is an outdated model in our modern society, especially given the academic declines that occur for some students during the summer break. As a result, the shift to year-round school is becoming a more common practice. Continue reading “The Pros and Cons of Year Round School”

How to Get The Most Out of Being HomeSchooled

“Home is where the heart is”, but it has also become where students and parents provide a non-traditional setting for learning. Parents and students, alike, have chosen to take part in home-based instruction, but some are still hesitant on wondering if it is the best decision in getting seen by the college of their choosing. Homeschooling is not a new phenomenon and has continued to grow since the 1980’s. According to the National Center for Education Statistics, over 2.5 million students are homeschooled in the United States. Whether accompanied by individual instruction or e-learning supplementation, homeschool is a fantastic alternative and is respected by institutions of higher-learning. Continue reading “How to Get The Most Out of Being HomeSchooled”

5 Preparation Tips for Traveling Outside the U.S. and Europe

As an American, I’ve always considered traveling to Europe to be “Travel-Lite.” That statement is in no way meant to imply some kind of elitist condescension about what denotes “real” travel or not. On the contrary, European countries, such as Italy, France, Germany, and the United Kingdom (which is a part of Europe whether it likes it or not), are some of the most fascinating sites in the world to explore for history, culture, and general atmosphere. Go on a study abroad trip there and I might be your instructor! Continue reading “5 Preparation Tips for Traveling Outside the U.S. and Europe”

How to Manage Your Academic Stress

As we quickly approach Advanced Placement (AP), International Baccalaureate® (IB), and a vast list of more college preparatory tests, applications, or study abroad programs, stress can become the greatest adversary. Continue reading “How to Manage Your Academic Stress”

Hiking Mt. Fuji: Friendly Advice From Someone Who Made All the Mistakes For You

“Anthea, are those parachutes?!” my friend asked me. And just like that, I was so excited I practically shook in my dusty, busted sandals. I felt that feeling in the pit of my stomach – the one that usually means I’m about to experience an adrenaline rush. “I think they might be?” I said, looking over the edge at the dark, disappearing shapes falling through the thick, white of clouds circling the top of Mt. Fuji, leaving trails behind them. Continue reading “Hiking Mt. Fuji: Friendly Advice From Someone Who Made All the Mistakes For You”

Cuba’s Fusterlandia: Transforming a Neighborhood

Cuba and U.S. relations have improved enough that visiting is no longer impossible. One must apply for the appropriately categorized trip on their visa. Cuba is almost indescribable in less than fifty thousand words, but suffice it to say the culture, history, and nature are uniquely beautiful. And the people are unlike anywhere else – a particular kindness, and an unusual sense of safety for two women traveling alone, was a pleasant surprise. Continue reading “Cuba’s Fusterlandia: Transforming a Neighborhood”