3 Study Technique Tips for New Language Learners

Most of us are aware of the subtle differences in how each of us learns information, both in the classroom, and on the job or in the field. There are some commonalities in how memory works, for example remembering the first and last items in a list, or having an easier time digesting numbers in groups (it’s usually easier to remember 483 than 4, 8, and 3). But that being said, there are also distinct differences in our strengths and weaknesses. Some people truly do learn better listening to a lecture than reading a book, while others will get the most out of classes where slides and diagrams are used. Some of us like to organize our information in bullet point lists, while others need a single mnemonic to memorize an entire paragraph. But when it comes to language learning, study suggestions are so often the same; vocabulary flash cards in particular come to mind. Don’t get me wrong, flash cards are great, and sometimes they can turn rote memorization into a more streamlined process. But given how many different ways we all prefer to intake information, it’s not a bad idea to collect different techniques and tools. Continue reading “3 Study Technique Tips for New Language Learners”

How to Make the Most of Your College Electives

If you going into college already set on what you want to study and the degree(s) you hope to graduate with, then college electives may seem like stumbling blocks to the finish line. But they’re actually incredibly useful and can improve your overall job prospects if you approach them right; it’s not just universities trying to take an extra dollar out of your pocket. Although it can sometimes feel that way – try to make the most of your required electives! Plus, if you go into school with no idea what you want to do or what you want to study, they’re just that much more important and helpful for exploring. Continue reading “How to Make the Most of Your College Electives”

How to Get The Most Out of Being HomeSchooled

“Home is where the heart is”, but it has also become where students and parents provide a non-traditional setting for learning. Parents and students, alike, have chosen to take part in home-based instruction, but some are still hesitant on wondering if it is the best decision in getting seen by the college of their choosing. Homeschooling is not a new phenomenon and has continued to grow since the 1980’s. According to the National Center for Education Statistics, over 2.5 million students are homeschooled in the United States. Whether accompanied by individual instruction or e-learning supplementation, homeschool is a fantastic alternative and is respected by institutions of higher-learning. Continue reading “How to Get The Most Out of Being HomeSchooled”

3 Simple Tips for Making the Most of Your Language Learning App

Like many other areas of study, the field of L≥2 (second, third, fourth… language) development is experiencing rapid change associated with advances in relevant technology. The growing popularity of “language learning apps” may be one of the more obvious indicators of this trend. These apps seem to open the door to language study options that would be inconceivable in a traditional (20th century type) scholastic language program: for example, several apps offer upwards of 70 language courses to English speakers – this far exceeds the 4 offered at my high school, when I was a student! But whether or not this actually translates into improved L≥2 development for users of these apps has yet to be convincingly demonstrated. In fact, some linguists, like Donovan Nigel’s post to Mezzofanti Guild blog, suggests that today’s apps may actually be detrimental to language learning. Continue reading “3 Simple Tips for Making the Most of Your Language Learning App”

Too Old to Learn a Language? Think Again…

Have you always wanted to learn a new language but question how realistic it is since you didn’t grow up hearing and speaking the language? I had this fear in high school and college, and for many years this prevented me from taking language classes. If I had known then what I known now, I wouldn’t have hesitated… Continue reading “Too Old to Learn a Language? Think Again…”

Test Anxiety: What it Means for You and Your Grades

Test anxiety symptoms are real and overwhelming when they are out of control. You recognize the signs of sweaty palms, headaches, stomach pains, dizziness, and many other physical indicators.

Even when you prepared for the test, you were calm and ready to tackle any situation – except test anxiety. The pressure to perform well for exams is overwhelming for many students. Continue reading “Test Anxiety: What it Means for You and Your Grades”

Most Strategic Ways to Accelerate Your Study Abroad Skills

Whether it is midterm exams or a brief quiz, you know to prepare your mindset to do well. Although most students feel cramming for an exam is ideal in certain circumstances, you might want to think twice.

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Actionable Ways to Rock Your Study Skills

Study skills may come easy for some students. However, for those students that struggle to keep up with term papers, discussions, projects, and all other tasks during a study abroad program is overwhelming. Perhaps, you have tried a system of study skills. Does the feeling of achievement leave you empty? It might be time to evaluate your study skills method. What new strategies help you take action to build concise study skills?
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Life-Changing Ways to Prepare for College Standardized Exams

Do you ever feel the pressure of college standardized testing the same as a ton of bricks piling on top of you? Most students sense this way as they prepare for a new journey to school or study abroad.

Besides students feeling overwhelmed, they often lack direction how to plan for standardized testing. Here are some useful tips to keep you on track with your studies and sanity.

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Language Brain

Studying a new language can be tiring, and if you’re studying abroad and immersing yourself in a new language and culture, your days can be exhausting. I studied in Spain. I remember my first day listening to and speaking in Spanish, with no English breaks. I walked home that evening and my brain felt like a bowl of mashed potatoes. While learning a new language can be exhausting, it is one of the best things we can do for the health of our brains, not matter the age. Learning new things strengthens our brains, and the more you learn, the stronger and more connected the parts of your brain will become. Continue reading “Language Brain”